Slow Fashion

How can I shop more sustainably?

This might not be something you'd expect to hear from a clothing brand, but the easiest way to be more sustainable is to buy less.  Did you know that by extending the life of a piece of clothing in your wardrobe by double, you can reduce its carbon footprint by over 40%?  In the UK, the average lifetime of an item of clothing is just 2.2 years. We have got used to buying more than we really need as clothing has become cheaper and cheaper.  It is often said that the most sustainable piece of clothing is the one that's already in your wardrobe!


In the UK, the average lifetime of an item of clothing is just 2.2 years. We have got used to buying more than we really need as mass-produced clothing has become cheaper and cheaper.  Did you know that by simply extending the life of a piece of clothing in your wardrobe by double, you can reduce its carbon footprint by over 40%?

Two women wearing green sequin jumpsuits by slow fashion brand Rosa Bloom talk over the counter at the Rosa Bloom Pop Up Shop.

But what if I donate my second-hand clothes to charity shops?


Donating unwanted clothing to charity shops isn't as good a solution as you might think: the used-clothing market is saturated with garments, many of which were too badly made in the first place to be worth re-selling.  The word 'recycling' in relation to clothing usually means that if the garment can't be re-sold here in the UK, it is bundled up and shipped to developing countries; there, it damages local economies by flooding the market with cheap clothing.  Millions of tonnes ends up in landfill or incinerators.

Less than 0.1% of all clothing collected by charities or take-back schemes is recycled into new fibres. Even H&M's own Sustainability Manager admitted as such at a press conference promoting their clothing take-back schemes.  They encourage customers to drop off unwanted clothing at donation points in stores, supposedly to be recycled into new textiles, which is evidently a very long way from the truth. Buying only clothes that we really love or need, taking better care of them, and wearing them for longer, is an easy way to have a real impact.

Three female friends at the slow fashion brand Rosa Bloom pop up shop stand together while holding pink sequin clothing.
Close up shot of a woman's hands as she sews sequins on to black fabric.
An Indonesian lady wears a kimono covered in green and gold irridecent sequins.
Close up of a woman's hands as she presents her name on the label of a slow fashion item of clothing.

What is Rosa Bloom doing to help?


Take good care of your Bloom pieces by following the advice in our Care Guide, to prolong their lifespan and make sure that you can treasure them for years to come.

Have you had a little bit too much fun in your Rosa Bloom and lost a few sequins along the way?  We try to keep a stash of as many of our archive sequin colours as possible. If you need some spares to repair your item, get in touch.  We can send you some sequins to patch-up your piece.  We can also carry out repairs for you at a small charge - please contact us with photos and details about your repair for a quote.

Do you have a Rosa Bloom languishing in the back of your wardrobe that doesn't get worn any more?   Or, can't afford a new piece and want to pick up a bargain?  Or maybe you're hunting for an old style or colour?  We have launched a dedicated Instagram account as a gift to our community, where you can buy & sell your pre-loved Rosa Bloom pieces to people you know will love and cherish them for years to come.  Check it out here @rosabloom_buyandsell

A man at the slow fashion brand  Rosa Bloom's pop up event looks looks very happy as he walks through the shop wearing a silver sequin top and silver sequin leggings.

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